Josie, 19, Australia

I have a tendency to become a tad too invested in the lives of fictional characters.

Castle | Bones | Criminal Minds | Modern Family | Parenthood | NCIS LA | New Girl | 2 Broke Girls | Supernatural | NCIS | Major Crimes | Chicago Fire

A lover of Taylor Swift, F.R.I.E.N.D.S, YouTube, Fanfictions, musicals and make-up.

~ Fearless is living in spite of those things that scare you to death ~

 

captn-bucky:

bellecosby:

I wonder how many stranger’s stories we make it into? You know, maybe someone saw you in passing and told their friends about how pretty the girl in the lavender sweater was. Or maybe they overheard you say a joke and repeated it to their friend, confessing that they heard it from some guy at the store. 

I think about this all the time

The sign of a beautiful person is that they always see beauty in others

Omar Sulaiman (via aureat)

officialbrucespringsteen:

hey isnt that jonas brother a disney kid

and now he’s half naked everywhere

and everyone is admiring him for growing up so nicely

wasnt miley cyrus a disney kid too

and she was half naked everywhere

and everyone freaked their fuckin shit

intj-confessions:

boxlunches:

feminist-space:

mpreg-tony:

urulokid:

millika:

Who’s Alex?
Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

Actually, I’ve studied design and advertising, and I can tell you that the reason people would look at this and immediately assume Alex is the boy is because, quite simply, the boy is the focal point of the ad.
English-speaking readers’ line of sight goes from left to right and up to down. This ad leads the viewer from the words MEET ALEX etc straight to the boy and then over and down to the girl. I didn’t even notice there was a set of parenthesis with words in them in the ad until I looked the fourth time. 
This is a fallacious confirmation bias, as anyone looking at it will assume Alex is the focal point (i.e. The Boy) and then if they’re perceptive they’ll notice the words at the bottom. Aha! Those damn gender stereotypes gotcha again! Except no, because the ad literally forces you to read it as “Alex is the boy” by the visual language and lines of sight. 
A better ad would have been structured from top to bottom instead of left to right, and wouldn’t have pushed the girl, the real subject of the ad (who, by the way, has been VISUALLY PUSHED OUT OF HER RIGHTFUL SPACE ON THE AD BY HER BROTHER) off to the corner as far away from her identifiers as possible. 
Here, I’ll make you a better ad.

Bam. Shitty stock photo but you get the point. If anyone sees this and assumes Alex is the boy, they don’t have the the ad layout to use as an excuse for their internalized gender shittery. Likewise, the ad isn’t actively trying to make you read it a certain way and THEN making you feel guilty for interpreting it the way they designed it to be. 

Thank got someone pointed this out… I didn’t have the energy to do it. 

Agreed with urulokid. And I certainly like urulokid’s version of the ad.

I was thinking the same thing when I originally saw this post, but then I ignored that instinct and kept scrolling. So I’m glad someone laid that counter argument out so beautifully.

Thank you for fixing it. Glad I’m not the only one who was pissed off by that.

intj-confessions:

boxlunches:

feminist-space:

mpreg-tony:

urulokid:

millika:

Who’s Alex?

Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

Actually, I’ve studied design and advertising, and I can tell you that the reason people would look at this and immediately assume Alex is the boy is because, quite simply, the boy is the focal point of the ad.

English-speaking readers’ line of sight goes from left to right and up to down. This ad leads the viewer from the words MEET ALEX etc straight to the boy and then over and down to the girl. I didn’t even notice there was a set of parenthesis with words in them in the ad until I looked the fourth time. 

This is a fallacious confirmation bias, as anyone looking at it will assume Alex is the focal point (i.e. The Boy) and then if they’re perceptive they’ll notice the words at the bottom. Aha! Those damn gender stereotypes gotcha again! Except no, because the ad literally forces you to read it as “Alex is the boy” by the visual language and lines of sight. 

A better ad would have been structured from top to bottom instead of left to right, and wouldn’t have pushed the girl, the real subject of the ad (who, by the way, has been VISUALLY PUSHED OUT OF HER RIGHTFUL SPACE ON THE AD BY HER BROTHER) off to the corner as far away from her identifiers as possible. 

Here, I’ll make you a better ad.

image

Bam. Shitty stock photo but you get the point. If anyone sees this and assumes Alex is the boy, they don’t have the the ad layout to use as an excuse for their internalized gender shittery. Likewise, the ad isn’t actively trying to make you read it a certain way and THEN making you feel guilty for interpreting it the way they designed it to be. 

Thank got someone pointed this out… I didn’t have the energy to do it. 

Agreed with urulokid. And I certainly like urulokid’s version of the ad.

I was thinking the same thing when I originally saw this post, but then I ignored that instinct and kept scrolling. So I’m glad someone laid that counter argument out so beautifully.

Thank you for fixing it. Glad I’m not the only one who was pissed off by that.

itsb0sstime:

georgia-dream:

if your boyfriend is your best friend, you’re doing it right.

if your boyfriend is your only friend, you’re doing it wrong.

THANK. YOU.

found-liquorstore-and-drank-itt:

year-of-the-deanmon:

sheslikea-comet:

So I was out buying halloween decorations and I saw this wig, picked it up and then I saw it…..

WHAT IN THE WORLD?!?!?
WHY IS JENSEN’S FACE ON IT?!

cuz he’s pretty